Remarkably Retro

Mid-century modern house in Dallas, cooled by a lily pond and a layer of water on the flat roof. Designed by Architect O’Neil Ford. The house is still standing. Top picture is from 1952, bottom picture is from 2012. Considering the neighborhood where it’s located, I imagine that it also had central heat and air, even in 1952. 

An office inside the Seagram Building, New York, 1958

An office inside the Seagram Building, New York, 1958

Knoll Leisure Collection, 1966

Knoll Leisure Collection, 1966

Toronto City Hall from Progressive Architecture magazine, October 1966

Toronto City Hall from Progressive Architecture magazine, October 1966

Lobby of the Union Carbide building, New York City, 1960

Lobby of the Union Carbide building, New York City, 1960

chailatteplease:

American architect Louis Sullivan (1856-1924) is considered by many to be the father of modernism in American architecture and the creator of the modern skyscraper, as well as being the mentor of Frank Lloyd Wright. He’s also known for the extraordinary details in his work. Here’s a detail from his Prudential (or Guarantee) Building in Buffalo New York.

chailatteplease:

American architect Louis Sullivan (1856-1924) is considered by many to be the father of modernism in American architecture and the creator of the modern skyscraper, as well as being the mentor of Frank Lloyd Wright. He’s also known for the extraordinary details in his work. Here’s a detail from his Prudential (or Guarantee) Building in Buffalo New York.

xoyolondon:

Oscar Niemeyer is one of the giants of 20th century architecture and design, his monumental style with it’s huge vistas curving lines and monochromatic palate created a new Utopian vision. This was most evident in his greatest work, Brazil’s capital Brasilia. Brasilia was created from the ground up in the middle of the remote center known for little else but Cattle rearing, the new capital was to be the heart of the new socialistic state. Sadly shortly after it’s completion a military dictatorship took hold and Niemeyer was exiled for his Communist sympathies. His work would continue to be defined by a optimistic internationalism taking in the Constantine area of Algiers, the french Communist party HQ in Paris and the University of Haifa in Israel. At 103 he continues to work on a variety of projects and live in Brazil.

vintagemadeinbrazil:

brazilwonders:

José Oswald de Andrade Souza (January 11, 1890 – October 22, 1954) was a Brazilian poet and polemicist. He was born and spent most of his life in São Paulo.
Andrade was one of the founders of Brazilian modernism and a member of the Group of Five, along with Mário de Andrade, Anita Malfatti, Tarsila do Amaral and Menotti del Picchia. He participated in the Week of Modern Art (Semana de Arte Moderna).
Andrade is best known for his manifesto of Brazilian nationalism, Manifesto Antropófago (Cannibal Manifesto), published in 1928. Its argument is that Brazil’s history of “cannibalizing” other cultures is its greatest strength, while playing on the modernists’ primitivist interest in cannibalism as an alleged tribal rite. Cannibalism becomes a way for Brazil to assert itself against European postcolonial cultural domination. The Manifesto’s iconic line is “Tupi or not Tupi: that is the question.” The line is simultaneously a celebration of the Tupi, who had been at times accused of cannibalism (most notoriously by Hans Staden), and an instance of cannibalism: it eats Shakespeare.

Oswald de Andrade painted by Tarsila do Amaral, 1922

vintagemadeinbrazil:

brazilwonders:

José Oswald de Andrade Souza (January 11, 1890 – October 22, 1954) was a Brazilian poet and polemicist. He was born and spent most of his life in São Paulo.

Andrade was one of the founders of Brazilian modernism and a member of the Group of Five, along with Mário de Andrade, Anita Malfatti, Tarsila do Amaral and Menotti del Picchia. He participated in the Week of Modern Art (Semana de Arte Moderna).

Andrade is best known for his manifesto of Brazilian nationalism, Manifesto Antropófago (Cannibal Manifesto), published in 1928. Its argument is that Brazil’s history of “cannibalizing” other cultures is its greatest strength, while playing on the modernists’ primitivist interest in cannibalism as an alleged tribal rite. Cannibalism becomes a way for Brazil to assert itself against European postcolonial cultural domination. The Manifesto’s iconic line is “Tupi or not Tupi: that is the question.” The line is simultaneously a celebration of the Tupi, who had been at times accused of cannibalism (most notoriously by Hans Staden), and an instance of cannibalism: it eats Shakespeare.

Oswald de Andrade painted by Tarsila do Amaral, 1922

51vc:

Nissen House, Melbourne. 1963 by glen.h on Flickr.
51vc:

Cabin Class Bar, Michelangelo by glen.h on Flickr.